elcome to Kristen Bell Hub your newest fansource for everything about the amazing Kristen Bell. Best known for her role as the teenage private eye Veronica Mars. Also known for movies like Forgetting Sarah Marshall, When in Rome & Frozen. TV Shows like Heroes, House of Lies & NBC show The Good Place.

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How do hands move in heaven? Ted Danson knows. Watch him in “The Good Place,” NBC’s circle-squaring philosophical sitcom about life, death, good, evil, redemption and frozen yogurt. As Danson speaks, his hands flutter and hover in front of him like a pair of trained birds. They poke and swirl, pinch and twist. They snap suddenly ahead to accent a word as if they’re plucking a feather from a passing breeze. Danson is tall and slim — he was a basketball star growing up — and his hands are expressively large. He can move them, when he needs to, with the long-fingered languor of Michelangelo’s God reaching out to touch Adam. On the show, Danson plays an “architect” of the afterlife named Michael, a sort of immortal Willy Wonka who dresses in bright suits and bow ties. He is always flying into spasms of delight over the fascinating novelties of human culture — paper clips, suspenders, karaoke, Skee-Ball — and in one scene he gets so celestially excited that he lunges into a squat, holds his arms out in front of him and gyrates his wrists like an electric mixer on full blast. “How do you pump your fist again?” he asks. “Is this it?”

Danson is now 70, roughly twice the age he was when he started on “Cheers,” and he carries his seniority around as if it were the funniest thing in the world. In recent years, he has put together a virtuosic run of performances, including supporting roles in shows such as “Damages,” “Bored to Death” and “Fargo.” His turn on “The Good Place” seems like a culmination of this late-phase greatness: a role he was born, and then very carefully aged, to play. Although Danson still has the seductive good looks of Sam Malone, his hair has gone chalk white, and he delivers his lines with an ease so deep it looks effortless and instinctive — the kind of thing you couldn’t practice if you tried. [Source]

Kristen is on the cover of American Air, the companion magazine released in all American Airline flights. I’ve updated the gallery with the shoot and the digital scans.

   
   

Kristen & Ted were featured on The Wrap’s digital magazine featuring the biggest comedy contenders for the upcoming TV Awards seasons. Check out the photos and digital scans of the article.

  
 

Heaven or hell? Devil or angel? And does it even matter?

NBC’s delightful comedy series “The Good Place” started out as a vision of paradise, albeit a rather odd and completely secular paradise; it ended its first season with the show-shattering reveal that our human characters had actually been spending their time in a radical new version of hell designed to get them to torture each other rather than leaving that job to the pros.

And in Season 2, the show from “Parks and Recreation” creator Mike Schur kept upending itself in the most delicious of ways.

This is a show that can make hell kind of charming and give a fun, cuddly twist to the afterlife. Kristen Bell somehow makes us root for a woman whose self-obsession knows no bounds but who’s smarter and maybe even nicer than she lets on. Ted Danson was a scene stealer even in the first season as a human-torturing demon who had to hide his true nature from the other characters and from the audience.

(Granted, words like demon may not be appropriate for an altogether nonreligious and bureaucratic afterworld; he’s middle management at best, and not very good at his job of torturing humans.)

On a break early in the filming of Season 3, Bell and Danson discussed the pleasures and challenges of a show that delights in blowing up its own premise over and over. (Warning: spoilers ahead.)

Season 2 must have been a real kick for you, Ted, because you finally got to…
TED DANSON Be who I am. Yeah, it was really fun. And it was easier to find the funny, because funny usually is this kind of triangular thing between you, another character and the audience. But I had no relationship to the audience in Season 1. They never saw me in a private moment, or I would have been twirling my mustache.

Would you have taken the part without the knowledge that eventually you were going to get to show who this guy really is?
DANSON Oh, I would have done it. I signed on before I saw a script. I knew that Kristen was likely going to do it. I then listened to Mike Schur empty his mind for an hour and tell me everything he knew about the show and the twist. And I really signed up for Mike Schur.

KRISTEN BELL He can tell a story with detail that is frightening, like a computer. “Here’s what I want to do in Episode 9, and it’s a callback to Episode 6…” And I’m like, “You haven’t even written the pilot, bro! Slow down!”

DANSON Is this the first job you’ve taken when you haven’t read a script?

BELL Yeah. Wow. Yeah. We were sold on the idea, with the twist, and with his commitment to cliff-hangers and pulling the rug out from under people. I just thought, “What a goal. Let him try, I’d love to be a part of it.” [More at source]


   

In tumultuous times such as these, comedy is more essential than ever. It offers some common ground, some (mostly) safe space and, best of all, a good time. “Everybody is dying for a little bit of comic relief,” says Eric McCormack whose “Will & Grace” recently relaunched after 10 years away. McCormack was one of six comedic actors from shows both new and familiar to join the Envelope for a free-flowing conversation that at one point threatened to make a left-turn into an intervention for “Glow’s” Marc Maron.

Along with McCormack (whose “Will & Grace” regathers its original cast) and Maron (whose series is about the launch of women’s wrestling and the cocaine-sniffing director behind it), were Kristen Bell (“The Good Place,” an examination of morality set in the afterlife), Bill Hader (“Barry,” a hitman who wants to be an actor), Sara Gilbert (“Roseanne,” the family we know and love some 20 years later) and Justina Machado (“One Day at a Time,” a family similar to the one we know and love some 30 years later). Between the giggles, the group touched on such topics as diversity, nostalgia, bad dye jobs and the Fonz.

Here are excerpts from that conversation, edited for length and clarity. [More at source]

I want to get just a taste of the upcoming season, and I have it on good authority that one of you has trouble keeping secrets.
Bell: Loose Lips Danson!

Danson: That’s absolutely true. I’m impossible. So let me guess: You probably want to know about what’s in store for our group of humans, who, last we saw them, were down on Earth pursuing their second chances. And Michael and Janet are monitoring them …

Bell: I think we can reveal that, metaphorically, this next season is about how you can play chess with people who don’t know you’re playing with them and doing so in a way that doesn’t affect the greater universe.

Danson: What she said. [Laughs]

Bell: Because our characters don’t know there’s a greater mission. We’re meandering on Earth. What I loved about that whole last episode from Season 2 was that it summed up everyone’s yearly existence from Jan. 1 to March 1. You make resolutions. You’re going to be a better person. You’re going to work out more. You’re going to eat broccoli. And by March, none of that is happening. You saw it with Eleanor. She vows to change, and then she gets bored.

So now we are all left on Earth separately. And what we learned from the first two seasons is that our strengths come when we’re together. But can Michael and Janet tamper with us without affecting the universe? [More at Source]

Kristen attended the launch party for This Bar Saves Lives on Thursday (April 5) at Ysabel in West Hollywood, California. Kristen is one of the brand’s co-founders and she was joined by business partners Troian Bellsario, Patrick J. Adams, Ryan Devlin, Todd Grinnell, and Ravi Patel. Every time one of the company’s bars are sold, it donates life-saving nutrition to a child in need. Over 3.5 million nutritional packets have been donated to date, enough to impact over 270,000 lives.

Head to the gallery for photos of Kristen during the press conference and her shoot to promote the brand.

   
 

Kristen is part of the new Whole Foods Market campaign for the holidays! Check out the videos with Kristen then head to the gallery for some photos from the campaign.

   


Mila Kunis once delivered quite the inadvertent shock to her UPS driver.

The star of A Bad Moms Christmas opened up to PEOPLE for this week’s issue about an incident shortly following the birth of now-11-month-old son Dimitri Portwood, when she’d left her front door unlocked.

“My UPS guy is really sweet, and I’ve had him for years, and he always [just] drops off the package, but you can see him through the glass window,” she tells PEOPLE. “At one point, I was just shirtless, because I was hot. I was just with my baby, and I was three days postpartum, so it still was like [I was] pregnant.”

“I was just like, ‘Hey.’ Didn’t even think about it, naked, skin-to-skin with my baby,” recalls the actress, 34. “And he just puts the package down and looks up. And I was like … I didn’t even care.”

Kunis admits she “wasn’t really embarrassed” about the slip and “felt more bad for the UPS guy” than herself. “I was like, ‘This is not nearly what you thought you were walking into,’ ” she jokes.

“I think he may have been like, ‘Oh, that’s what they look like?’ You know, a nursing breast and a [non-nursing] breast. It’s just two very different boobs.” [Source]

 

It hasn’t been a good year at the box office — especially for live-action comedies. Over the past 15 months, only three films in the genre — “Bad Moms,” the “Ghostbusters” reboot and “Girls Trip” — were able to crack $100 million in domestic ticket sales.

This is what Suzanne Todd, the producer of “Bad Moms,” has been constantly reminded of in the wake of her film’s success. Yes, the R-rated flick made more money at the multiplex than anyone in the industry had anticipated: $183 million worldwide following its July 2016 release. But given the failure of so many other comedies, what if the film’s success was a fluke? Was it really a good idea to take the risk on a sequel?

“Especially when — gasp! — we wanted to add three stars who were over the age of 35,” Todd said with a laugh.

The first “Bad Moms” followed three mothers — played by Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn — who initially feel inferior to the PTA-attending, bake sale-organizing parents at their kids’ school. But after the trio form a friendship, they relish in their “bad” parenting skills, learning to embrace their supposed imperfections. The sequel, “A Bad Moms Christmas,” adds three bad grandmothers to the mix, those over-35 stars: Susan Sarandon, Cheryl Hines and Christine Baranski — who arrive in town just in time to judge their daughters’ parenting over the holidays.

The second film came together incredibly fast. Following the success of the original, writer-directors Jon Lucas and Scott Moore (the screenwriters who launched “The Hangover” franchise) began working on a screenplay last September — just two months after “Bad Moms” hit theaters. They finished it within a matter of weeks and in December, STX Films announced the sequel was a go. “A Bad Moms Christmas” went into production in April — less than a year after the first one was released — and the movie opens Nov. 1. [Source]

   

Kristen Bell is a champion multitasker. During this interview, for instance, the actress and mom of two is talking on the phone, eating granola, and driving home after a busy day of filming her NBC comedy, The Good Place. Simultaneously, Kristen is planning out the rest of the day in her head, including a wardrobe fitting, picking up her kids from school, and making dinner, among a thousand other things. She squeezes in exercise the same way: “At work, while I’m running through lines with my fellow actors, I’ll be leaning backward on a chair doing triceps dips,” says Kristen, 37. “At home, when my kids and I are on a walk, and they’re meandering and looking at leaves, I’ll do lunges. I get it in however and whenever I can.” (Here’s how to squeeze in a workout during your lunch break.)

Health is a huge priority for Kristen, who cares deeply about the food she puts in her body and makes being active with her daughters one of her top goals. “To me, being healthy means feeling good about the choices I’m making,” she says. “And most important, it’s about keeping fit mentally and physically. I’m constantly reminding myself that it’s not about my thighs: It’s about my commitment and my happiness level.”

Good thing, then, that Kristen is feeling really happy these days. There’s her thriving career—besides The Good Place, she is starring in the movie A Bad Moms Christmas, in theaters November 3, and reprising her role as the voice of Anna in Frozen 2, which goes into production next year—her #couplegoals marriage to actor Dax Shepard; and her two adorable daughters, Lincoln, 4, and Delta, 2 1/2. She’s also committed to doing good and giving back: Kristen is the cofounder of This Bar Saves Lives, a company that donates a lifesaving nutritional packet to a child in need for every bar sold. (She helped two families get to shelter during Hurricane Irma too.)

Where does she find the hours, let alone the energy, for all that? Well, pasta and pizza definitely help. “Carbs—I love ’em!” she says. But a masterful game plan is also required. Here are Kristen’s secrets for maximizing time—and having a blast along the way. [More at Source]